Republicans who backed Jan. 6 investigation facing primary challenges -- with some surprising results
Trump supporters rioting at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021. (Shutterstock.com)

Five of the 35 House Republicans who voted to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection are facing primary challenges on Tuesday, after a series of bombshell hearings on Donald Trump's involvement in the effort to overturn his election loss.

So far, 12 of those GOP lawmakers have won or advanced in their primary elections, while two have lost and nine others have retired or resigned, and those results suggest Republicans can survive their vote, reported the Washington Post.

“Even for those who’ve survived their primaries they’ve had to sweat in order to do it,” said GOP strategist Ken Spain.

The Republicans who've won have been able to draw a distinction between the commission they voted to establish -- which would have allowed leaders from both parties to appoint members -- and the select committee that was eventually formed after House speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-VA) rejected two of House minority leader Kevin McCarthy's (R-CA) picks and he pulled back the rest of his choices.

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“I did not vote for Speaker Pelosi’s partisan committee that is further politicizing Jan. 6 during an election year,” said Rep. Blake D. Moore (R-UT), who voted for the investigation and is facing a primary challenge from conservative Andrew Badger. “The committee has been unfair since its beginning."

The commission has been a major election issue for every Republican who voted to investigate the insurrection, even for the 147 members who voted against certification of Joe Biden's election win that day, such as Rep. Michael Guest (R-MS), who's facing a runoff Tuesday against conservative challenger Michael Cassidy.

“Tuesday’s Republican primary isn’t just a choice between Congressman Guest and myself," says one of Cassidy's ads. "It’s your chance to say ‘no’ to the Jan. 6 commission that Guest voted for.”